The ladder of hell, or, The Protestants libertine doctrine
Read Online
Share

The ladder of hell, or, The Protestants libertine doctrine being the broad way which leadeth the followers of it to their eternall ruine and destruction in hell

  • 441 Want to read
  • ·
  • 70 Currently reading

Published by Birchley Hall Press? in [Lancashire? .
Written in English

Subjects:

  • Protestantism -- Controversial literature,
  • Conscience -- Early works to 1800

Book details:

Edition Notes

Other titlesProtestants libertine doctrine
Statementset foorth in prose and verse
SeriesEarly English books, 1475-1640 -- 1708:7
The Physical Object
FormatMicroform
Pagination[16] p
Number of Pages16
ID Numbers
Open LibraryOL15186822M

Download The ladder of hell, or, The Protestants libertine doctrine

PDF EPUB FB2 MOBI RTF

The ladder of hell, or, The Protestants libertine doctrine: being the broad way which leadeth the followers of it to their eternall ruine and destruction in hell Type: E-Book. The ladder of hell, or, The Protestants libertine doctrine being the broad way which leadeth the followers of it to their eternall ruine and destruction in hell / set foorth in prose and verse. ([Lancashire?: Birchley Hall Press?, ca. ]), by Cranmer Covbridge (HTML . Cranmer Covbridge has written: 'The ladder of hell, or, The Protestants libertine doctrine' -- subject(s): Protestantism, Controversial literature, Early works to , Conscience Asked in History. James A. Wylie author of “The Papacy,” “Daybreak in Spain,” &c. “Protestantism, the sacred cause of God’s Light and Truth against the Devil’s Falsity and Darkness.” -Carlyle. Cassell & Company, Limited: London, Paris & New York. A Voice from the Philadelphian Church.

In Christian theology, Hell is the place or state into which, by God's definitive judgment, unrepentant sinners and atheists pass in the general judgment, or, as some Christians believe, immediately after death (particular judgment). Its character is inferred from teaching in the biblical texts, some of which, interpreted literally, have given rise to the popular idea of Hell. Eastern Orthodoxy. All the Orthodox Christian Churches have condemned the Freemasonry. In , the Synod of the Church of Greece condemned Freemasonry, forbade all clerics to be members of it, and demanded that church members break all relations with Freemasonry. In , a condemnation was declared by the Church of Romania, and in the s by the Orthodox Church in America and the . William Crockett, "Four views on Hell," Zondervan, (), Page Read reviews or order this book safely from online book store This is one of the Counterpoint series of books published by Zondervan. Each book presents conflicting views by Evangelical leaders on basic Christian beliefs. This is a reproduction of a book published before This book may have occasional imperfections such as missing or blurred pages, poor pictures, errant marks, etc. that were either part of the original artifact, or were introduced by the scanning process. We believe this work is culturally important, and despite the imperfections,Reviews: 1.

  This is the first of a five-part series on the doctrine of hell. Concerning hell, C. S. Lewis once wrote, “There is no doctrine which I would more willingly remove from Christianity than this, if it lay in my power.” In many ways, I agree with him. No one, Christians included, should like the idea of years I’ve felt that if you were to give me a Bible, a divine eraser, and ten. This ‘is one of the most important growth points of the Christians life’, writes Sinclair B. Ferguson. From this starting point, The Christian Life expounds such key biblical themes as grace, faith, repentance, new birth and assurance with clarity and contagious enthusiasm. ‘Christian doctrines are life-shaping’, explains the author, because ‘they show us the God we worship.’. Rethinking Hell contributor Chris Date is joined by Dr. Bart Ehrman to discuss Ehrman’s latest book, Heaven and Hell: A History of the Afterlife. Dr. Ehrman is an influential agnostic and critic of the Christian faith, especially in the area of the reliability of the biblical documents. The illustration that Mr. W. H. Mallock used to support her claims in his book Doctrine and Doctrinal Disruption seemed to me singularly bright and conclusive. In that remarkable volume, in which, with ruthless logic, he makes mincemeat of the Anglican claim to speak in the name of doctrinal Christianity, he pictures the Church of Rome as.